The initiative is a project of the Aga Khan Development Network

"...The tomb of Humayun is the first of the grand dynastic mausoleums that were to become synonyms of Mughal architecture. Here for the first time the monumental scale is attained that was to become the characteristic of Mughal imperial projects."

Prof. Ebba Koch, Mughal Historian

Humayun’s garden-tomb is built on a monumental scale, with no precedence in the Islamic world. The garden-tomb truly represents Mughal innovation with its monumental scale, and its garden setting representing the Quranic ideal. The monumental scale achieved here was to become the characteristic of Mughal imperial projects, culminating in the construction of the Taj Mahal. Within the complex also stand seven Mughal era garden-tombs which together form a unique ensemble of 16th century garden-tombs.

Read more about the architecture of Humayun’s Tomb
Statement of Significance
What did we do?

Since 2007, Humayun’s Tomb and its attached structures, including the gateways, pavilions and enclosure walls, have required major conservation works to restore the architectural integrity. With the Mughal details uncovered, conserved, restored where these had been obliterated by 20th century repairs, the Mughal grandeur has been once again revealed in parts. Similarly, major works have been undertaken to halt the accelerated deterioration that had set in as a result of past repairs with modern materials.

Humayun’s Tomb: Garden Restoration

Humayun’s Tomb garden restoration ‘is of course, the first privately funded restoration of a World Heritage Site in our country. The project has indubitably been an unqualified success, with the gardens, pathways, fountains and water channels of the chahar bagh having been brought close to their original perfection.’

- Dr Manmohan Singh, Prime Minister of India, 27 November 2004

The restoration of the garden at Humayun’s Tomb was a gift of His Highness the Aga Khan on the occasion of the 50th anniversary of India’s Independence.

The objective of the garden restoration project was to revitalise and revive the gardens and its pathways, water channels, pools and fountains as per the original design. This necessitated the conservation, repair and rebuilding of the water channel system and the repair, extension and reactivation of the irrigation system to ensure that water flows naturally through the watercourses and fountains. It also entailed the establishment of renewable water sources using rainwater harvesting to recharge groundwater and historic wells.

Click here to know more about the Garden Restoration Project...
Humayun's Tomb - Conservation Programme

Following the successful garden restoration undertaken in 1999-2003, AKTC commenced conservation works on the tom b in 2007 with co-funding from the Sir Dorabji Tata Trust and in partnership of the Archaeological Survey of India.

Working on a World Heritage Site where integrity and authenticity had been compromised by past repairs posed a significant challenge as did the need to reconstruct collapsed portions of structures that had been left unattended for a century. Conservation works have aimed at enhancing the cultural significance of the World Heritage Site by restoring the architectural integrity and authenticity of craftsmanship.

With the Mughal details uncovered, conserved, restored where these had been obliterated by 20th century repairs, the Mughal grandeur has been once again revealed in parts. Similarly, major works have been undertaken to halt the accelerated deterioration that had set in as a result of past repairs with modern materials.

Click here to know more about the conservation of Humayun’s Tomb...
Humayun's Tomb - Interpretation Centre

Following a decade-long revitalization efforts undertaken by the Aga Khan Trust for Culture, which included the conservation of monuments, restoration of parks and gardens and related socio-economic projects in neighbouring districts, the Humayun’s Tomb Complex now receives almost two million visitors annually, over 500,000 of them are school children. A greater number of pilgrims – from across the world and of many faiths – visit the adjoining Dargah of Hazrat Nizamuddin Auliya, the 14th century Sufi saint who continues to be revered seven centuries after his death.

An interpretation centre is being built by AKTC at the entrance of the World Heritage Site to enhance visitor experience; allow a better understanding of Mughal architecture and building craft traditions; shed light on the development of the Nizamuddin area over a millennium; and, most significantly, explain the pluralist Sufi cultural traditions that defined Hindustani culture for at least five centuries.

The Interpretation Centre aims at enhancing visitor experience and provides an opportunity to host collections on Mughal art, architecture and culture and become a model for other such facilities across the country.

Click here to know more about the Humayun’s Tomb Interpretation Centre...
ASI-AKTC Core Team 2010-13

In keeping with the agreement that the “ASI would be responsible for ... compliance with all regulations and heritage norms and necessary safeguards for the conservation work to the protected monuments under the project,”7 the project was supervised with periodic formal reviews by the leadership at ASI. The ASI Core Committee has held 43 reviews in which 41 individual ASI officers inspected ongoing works and provided instructions to the project team.

Read reviews Core Team meetings
Impacts of the Project
Related Information
04:19
Extension of Humayun's Tomb World Heritage Site
11:40
Humayun's Tomb's Conservation
08:43
The Gold Finial of Humayun's Tomb
04:28
Unveiling of Humayun's Tomb's Gold Finial
04:30
Dr. Mahesh Sharma, Minister of for Culture
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